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Showing posts from April, 2015

NYPL Oral History Project: Bridging Our Stories: Edith Prentiss

Meet EDITH PRENTISS, New York City's champion for people with disabilities. She lives in Washington Heights and was recently interviewed for the New York Public Library's Uptown Oral History project, Bridging Our Stories.  Edith talks about her experiences as a social worker with Holocaust survivors living uptown, why it is so important to be a visible and vocal voice for people with disabilities, and the upcoming Disability Pride Parade. http://oralhistory.nypl.org/interviews/edith-prentiss-kpiwcb

NYPL Oral History Project: Bridging Our Stories: Milton A. Tingling

IN CONVERSATION with MILTON A. TINGLING for the NYPL's Oral History Project, Bridging Our Stories: A longtime resident of Washington Heights, Milton Tingling currently serves as New York County Clerk. He's the man whose signature appears at the bottom of the your jury duty summons. The first African-American to hold this position, he succeeded Norman Goodman who retired after 45 years.  As a State Supreme Court Justice, Milton Tingling struck down Mayor Bloomberg's proposed ban on large sized sodas. In this comprehensive interview, he talks about growing up as the son of a judge and public school teacher, his former "careers" as a cab driver and MTA token booth clerk, the impact of growing up in Washington Heights, and as an "exclusive," what kind of soda he drinks. http://oralhistory.nypl.org/interviews/milton-tingling-v0rou1


NYPL Oral History Project: Bridging Our Stories: Eric K. Washington

RAISING THE DEAD: Meet Eric K. Washington, Uptown's brilliant historian and tour guide who is interviewed forNYPL The New York Public Library's Oral History Project, Bridging Our Stories.

In this conversation, Eric talks about transitions - the folks living in the neighborhood, those buried in Trinity Cemetery, and the impact of gentrification. He talks about neighborhood boundaries and how porous they can be and the ghosts of former neighbors who once lived in his apartment building, boxing heavyweight champion Jack Johnson and famed saxophonist Coleman Hawkins.

http://oralhistory.nypl.org/interviews/eric-k-washington-vvsbny