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The Sewing Lesson

Originally published in The Matador Review, Fall 2017

Things, you know, just things, from arguments to pots of noodles sometimes come to a rolling boil among my Manhattan neighbors in my own almost century-old apartment building sitting solidly north of the George Washington Bridge and just before the hills of Riverdale in the Bronx, with its mixture of random and eccentric folks living next door, above and below, and across from one another. We're a resilient collection of. . .click here to read more.


Recent posts

On Some Strange Mornings: world premiere at the Big Apple Film Festival, Thursday, Nov. 2

On Some Strange Mornings, my short film about a man living with Alzheimer's who cares for his mother with dementia, makes its world premiere at the Big Apple Film Festival on Thursday, November 2nd at 9 pm.

The film tells the story of Leo Pieter, an immigrant from the Dominican Republic who struggles to preserves his words through writing poetry and prose. Born in the Dominican Republic, he lives in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan and attends Riverstone Senior Life Services' Memory Center in Washington Heights.
Produced and Directed by Arlene Schulman Post Production Sound Mixing by Oscar Winner Tom Fleischman featuring a haunting score by Javier Mendez
Please visit the Big Apple Film website for more information about tickets and other stories told on film. 
And visit One Some Strange Mornings on Facebook for news and updates.
A thank you to our generous sponsors : 809 Bar & Grill * Mike Saab of C-Town, Inwood * Riverside Car and Limo Service * Washington Heights & I…

On Some Strange Mornings (trailer)

On Some Strange Mornings tells the story of Leo, a man living in upper Manhattan's Inwood neighborhood who has been diagnosed with the early stages of Alzheimer's. He cares for his mother who lives with dementia. Losing this words is a race again time. Shot entirely on location in Inwood and Washington Heights. 


For more information, please contact Arlene Schulman at arlenetheauthor@gmail.com

Arlene Schulman: The First 100 Years

NYPL: Bridging Our Stories - Detective Thomas Troppmann of the NYPD's 34th Precinct

Meet Detective Specialist Thomas Troppmann of the 34th Precinct, which covers Washington Heights and Inwood.

Detective Troppmann has spent his entire 30- year career on patrol in uptown Manhattan, a  rarity for one officer to remain on patrol for that long AND in the same precinct. He was a rookie police officer the same year his new partner, Detective Specialist Edwin Rodriguez, was born. These two have partnered up for the NYPD's newest community based policing program, Neighborhood Coordination Officers, a more high tech and targeted brand of beat cop.

In this wide-ranging conversation, Detective Troppmann talks about  the changes he's witnessed in "MY neighborhood", how he feels about body cams, changes in technology since he came on the job,  his relationship with his partner Rodriguez, being mistaken for Police Commissioner James O'Neill, corruption, getting older, and how the jocular relationship of the locker room evaporated into a silent, sad stillness fol…

Gentrification. Thanks to Peter Minuit

In my neighborhood in Inwood, soy used to have only one meaning: I am.

On the west side of Broadway and in some corners of the east, with migration and eating habits changing, soy has a more ominous meaning: One can purchase almost a full spectrum of soy food products, including pet food, in the C-Town and Fine Fare supermarkets on Broadway.

Soy is a symbol in the gentrification debate. And when it replaces the fried pastelitos stuffed with beef, crispy to stones, and tacos smothered in pico de gallo sold on the street or in Dominican restaurants, then the transition will sadly be complete.

Gentrification is a dirty word around town, particularly here in New York. The real culprit? Dutch trader Peter Minuit.

Featured in the Huffington Post. To continue reading, click here.


Another Generation is Already 'Woke'

My love for words was shared with just over a dozen high school students from around the city in a college readiness program this past year as they wrote essays about who they are, who they would like to become, and why they would like to travel to far off places like Chicago and Maine for their education. My role was to help them understand--no challenge them--to discover the power of language, of description, and organization to elevate their writing.

Some are first generation New Yorkers with roots in West Africa, South America, and the Caribbean, while others are African-American. All are heading off to college this fall, a first for many in their families. These teenagers translate language and popular culture for their elders and are often caught between the old world of traditions brought over from...

Featured in The Huffington Post. To continue reading, click here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/another-generation-is-already-woke_us_586c72ede4b068764965c54b